47 Tips To Be A Better Boss

47 Tips To Be A Better Boss

As you all know I speak frequently on leadership. As I was preparing to speak a few months ago I reached out on social media to ask people what tips they had for being a better boss. All of the responses I received were great and I thought that I would pass them along to you.

 

Michele Vercimak Set clear expectations with established timelines.

Kenna Vallejos Listen and acknowledge “good ideas”. This doesn’t mean all are implemented it does however build productivity and connection.

Breaelle Eddington I like a direct boss. Some one that can gives me constructive criticism on how to be better at my job.

Kami Orange Find out how people like to be acknowledged. Some people really love to be applauded in front of the whole office. Some people really love an email saying they did a great job that they can print off and keep forever. Some people like more time off and perks.

Just because you like a particular type of acknowledgment does not mean the people that work for you also like that type of acknowledgment. They might actually dislike the exact same kind of acknowledgment that you personally prefer.

If you really want to acknowledge people for doing a great job, find out what is meaningful for them and do that as much as possible.

Jeri Mae Rowley I want my boss to take good care of themselves–take a lunch break, exercise, go home to their family, laugh, ask for help, gather a good support group. Bosses burn out and singe the whole organization.

Ashlee Houghton Listen to the employees!!!

Jocelyn Harris Listen to your employees and not just think you have all the answers.

Heather Heslington Snyder Lead by example. Be the type of professional your subordinates will want to model themselves after.

Linda Joy Slagowski Not threatening emails with consequences if things don’t get done. Owning their limitations & mistakes. No favorites

Hollie Case Baxter Know how to do the job of the people you are in charge of.

Julie Phillips Shepherd Listen to employees and take appropriate action when necessary.

Kirsten Klug Trust. Don’t stand over my shoulder to watch me work

April Saunders Anderton Learn about different personality or energy types and recognize specific traits in your employees. Use that knowledge to assign tasks and to manage and motivate your employees.

Amberly Moon Kariuki Don’t ask for ideas or suggestions if you already know what you’re going to do and are not really open to ideas.

Jennifer Bottema Hinton I have always worked for small business owners. Do not complain about how tight money is or the lack of it (therefore eliminating employee raises an bonuses) and then spend excessively on personal life style. It destroys employee morale. If you want to spend on you, you earned it, but do not minimize your employee’s contributions by saying you are financially strapped/struggling.

Debra E Andrew Reward for great ideas, don’t just steal them as your own and keep the profits for yourself. Give room for growth, advancement, and pay increases. Don’t expect 5 times work for the same pay. If you add to responsibilities increase pay.

Whitney Lee Geertsen My advice is provide at least some training, listen to employees especially when they have particular skill sets, hire and accommodate disabled workers, and provide safety equipment and protocols for work hazards.

My first job in a seasonal grounds maintenance crew, I was dropped off alone at the cemetery and told to make it look pretty. All I had were hand tools and it wasn’t until halfway through was I shown were more efficient tools were. The third year same city different boss I had no tools (they would disappear over winter) and broke my own shovel. In horticulture, I knew more than my boss, but he was there because of his knowledge of sprinkling and lawn maintenance. During my three years, I had little help and was placed in charge of 40+ flower beds. I was inadequately trained and equipped for herbicide application.
(Note: I am autistic and struggle getting work. After my time with the city I developed a barrage of health problems. )

KyAnn Betz As an executive level leader with hundreds of employees here are mine:
1. No favorites, love them all and treat them all the same
2. Have a clear escalation plan, my employees know when and how to ask for my help, they are all amazing but even Superman needs the Justice League occasionally
3. Have a written employee handbook that covers roles, responsibilities, code of conduct, and expectations, make sure it’s on everyone’s desk
4. When there is praise it’s them, when there is punishment it’s me, I am ultimately accountable for everything and everyone
5. Don’t hire a watchdog and then do the barking yourself, this makes me NUTS when leaders do this
6. Have a suggestion box and actually answer the suggestions or implement them. I message my employees in the bathrooms through a Restroom Reader that I write every 10 work days, I answer their suggestions and tell them what’s coming up. They LOVE the Restroom Reader, I’m hilarious and I give it to them straight.
7. Calm down, your demeanor and energy becomes infectious, I work in nuclear weapons so this might be more important in my job, calm down as a leader, think it through, my employees know it’s not the 9th inning unless I say it’s the 9th inning, if everything is a crisis, nothing is
8. Rewards don’t have to be big, each of my hundreds of employees gets a hand written birthday card from me, I give a ton of high fives, and I paint “You Rock!” on regular rocks and give them out
9. Don’t be afraid of crucial conversations, if someone needs to be disciplined or dealt with do it fast, sometimes with shock and awe, but don’t delay it, there’s a reason they call me The Kraken behind my back, I deal with it head on and while I’m not always nice, I’m fair and morale is high because I prune the non performers.
10. Leaders take care of yourselves, sleep, eat, use your vacation days, unplug on weekends

Cindee Leavitt Jessop Listen. Don’t just talk. Listen.

Janet Thaeler My pet peeve is when bosses call you into a meeting and it’s not normal timing so you feel like you’re in trouble. Also I had a boss give me a glowing performance review in person but turned in a different version that wasn’t as stellar. Didn’t love that. I always appreciate honest feedback, well delivered, even if it’s to improve something. It’s hurtful when you find out about negative feedback from another source. The thing I love is when a boss has my back and I know there’s mutual trust.

Patti Merrill Cook Always appreciate, people who are appreciated work harder. Be clear in directions and expectations. Offer flexible schedules when possible so people can work at their best pace.

Suzanne Mulet The kind that drive to make you feel so inadequate that you fall apart. They get the smug look, like, “Finally broke her. I win.” And then cry all the way home. #TrueStory

Tammy Joy Lane Don’t have it so the only time you talk to your people is when they are in trouble. Don’t micromanage, Do appreciate, Don’t be shady

Stacy Bernal Don’t send a text on Friday that reads: “We need to talk on Monday.” Thus ruining my entire weekend. (Actually, that’s not true– I was in Nashville with friends to run a half marathon so I didn’t LET it ruin my weekend. But still. Pretty D-bag move.)

Jolene Griffin Durrant Don’t ask your employees to do anything you wouldn’t do

Shauna Light Talking to others about me when I can hear them. Such passive aggressive communication. Blaming everything in the office on a fall guy.

Cindy DeHart Check in with your team individually regularly, listen, provide feedback, learn from each other. Team members that feel acknowledged and input is valued are better individual members of a team, and produce stronger workloads. Don’t use examples of anyone we know. Ha! That part is a joke!

Adrienne Thomas Acknowledgement is key.

Laura Jeffs Be able to communicate with your employees and handle conflict between them professionally. Know how to delegate!!

Tori Christensen Nathan has pretty awful bosses: don’t hover, don’t put off payday until you feel like saying, don’t schedule meetings Friday at 5pm because that way it isn’t taking up “work time.” Pay people fairly, not just according to what their degree is, but to how they serve the company. Don’t make salaried people punch in and out. And did I mention not hovering?

Laura Jeffs Don’t micromanage!

Tambra Puro West Don’t be a boss, be a leader. Get engaged with your employees and get to know them (echoing comments above about praise, rewards, work and personality types). Not everyone works the same and everyone has a life outside of work. Don’t over-react and jump to conclusions from hearsay. Try to get the full story before making changes or taking action.

Madeline Faiella Treat people as a team, with respect. Not as underlings. Life can change in an instant.💖💖💖

Becky Ruths Dont ask your employees to do something you are unwilling to do.

Julie C. Hatch Quit micro-managing.

Jentrey Potter See people as people. I’ve never worked in the corporate world but I’ve seen enough of what my husband has gone through and it’s sad how often they forget that they’re dealing with real humans.

Kim Kauffman Everybody wants to be somebody… Imagine that everyone has an invisible sign on their chest that says.. MAKE ME FEEL SPECIAL!! Recognition is important. The best bosses are the ones that love to give recognition.. no matter how big or small! People work hard when they feel appreciated!!

Three Tips for Getting More Done

TV Interview on Fox 13 The Place

I loved being back in the studio with a Big Budah and the rest of the team at Fox 13s The Place
Enjoy this segment on how to coach yourself to getting more intentional about what you do in the day.
https://fox13now.com/2019/10/14/3-ways-to-eliminate-distractions-and-get-things-done/

How To Stay Grateful, Even When It’s Hard

Segment From The Lisa Valentine Clark Show

Being grateful can be easy, but we all do have hard days. This week on The Lisa Valentine Clark Show I discussed how to stay grateful, even on the hardest days. Listen in.

https://www.byuradio.org/episode/a819a833-da04-4f17-8090-fb2d4f538446/the-lisa-show-motivation-moment-forgiveness-after-tragedy-the-bathroom-writing-a-resume-investing-in-art-coding-literacy

45 Free, Cheap or FUN Date Ideas

One of the keys of High Performance and Happiness is making relationships a priority.  If you’re married or have a significant other in your life, I HIGHLY recommend weekly date night.  Making time for the ones you love helps them to know that they are important to you AND keeps the relationship alive.  Memories and connections keep relationships thriving.

Not sure what to do? Do you ever spend half of your date saying, “What do you want to do?” with the reply, “I don’t know, what do you want to do?”

Make a list!  My friends and I came up with a list of things we could do in our community that were both free or under $5, as a reminder that dates DON’T have to be expensive. They also don’t have to be “dinner and movie”, or our usual, “run errands and go to Costco.”

Your budget may be different, so choose some free things and some things within your budget.  Make the list now, and then you’ll have weeks worth of ideas waiting.  Check out your city’s recreational website for community events, concerts, activities, farmers markets, and more!

While this list is specific to where we live, perhaps it will give you ideas to generate your list!

Things you can do for free in Utah County & Provo, Utah:

  1. Go dream house hunting.
  2. Go for a drive up the canyon. (Provo Canyon, American Fork Canyon and Nebo Canyon are close!)
  3. Go for a drive up to Squaw Peak.
  4. Go to Pioneer Museum on 500 West in Provo.
  5. Go to BYU Art Museum for the free exhibit.
  6. Drive to Sundance and walk around the grounds.
  7. “Rent” movies from friends.
  8. Take a picnic to the park.
  9. Go to the Deseret Industries or Good Will and look around in the back for treasures.
  10. Go visit an elderly or widower in your neighborhood.
  11. Do service somewhere together. (community options available at justserve.org)
  12. Go to one of the free concerts in Provo in the summer.
  13. Go to free movies in the park in Provo in the summer.
  14. Put the kids to bed and have a candlelight dessert in the front room.
  15. Play a game together after kids go to bed.
  16. Go for a walk and talk about what you want to do when you are empty nesters and retired.
  17. Go to a new development and walk through unfinished homes.
  18. Walk on the Provo River Trail.
  19. Go “window shopping” at a mall.
  20. Go dream furniture shopping. Sit on every couch to find the one that’s most comfortable.
  21. Go to the library or bookstore and read magazines or books. Talk about the funny things you find.
  22. Go somewhere crazy and people watch. Don’t you ever wonder what their lives are like?
  23. Go to the Springville Art Museum.
  24. Take a tour of your Youth. Drive around to different places and tell funny stories.
  25. Drive to Bridal Veil Falls and wade around in the water.
  26. Drive up to Vivian Park with a blanket and watch the stars come out. Take bug spray!
  27. Find festivals. Peach Days, strawberry days, art festivals in small towns, Llama Days etc. Often free to get in to watch the concerts and see the booths. Can also be great for people watching.
  28. Go for a hike.
  29. Put the kids to bed and pull out old pictures of your marriage and of each of you as kids. Again, tell funny stories.
  30. Drive somewhere remote. Turn up the music in the car and dance outside. (or make-out inside).
  31. At Christmas time – drive around and look at Christmas lights. Play Christmas music or the radio.

 

Things you can do for under $10:

  1. Buy of bag of popsicles and go hand them out just outside or at the testing center at BYU.
  2. Go get ice cream.
  3. Go to the grocery store. Each person has $2.50. Split up and come back in 5 minutes with the biggest thing you can find for $2.50. Pick a winner and take your food to the park.
  4. Get a foot long sub sandwich and share. Take it to a park.
  5. Rent a movie from Redbox or Amazon Prime.
  6. Take $10 to the DI and find a treasure you want to take home. Or, each person gets $5 to buy the other a gift.
  7. Go to the Farmers Market and try 3 new fruits or veggies, or buy a loaf of fresh baked bread.
  8. Go Karaoke (available in downtown Provo)

Splurge date ideas:

  1. Go to a trampoline park.
  2. Go see a play
  3. Go to a concert.
  4. Take the tram ride at Sundance.
  5. Walk the Thanksgiving Point Gardens.
  6. Get pedicures.

25 Recommended Books That Will Change Your Life

Need Something on Your Reading List

I attended a mastermind this month with Kirk Weisler and he turned the mic on the attendees. He asked everyone to share two books that have changed their leadership or personal lives.  It was fascinating!  I compiled the list to share with you.
How many of these books have you read?  What would your two books be?

Here are the books I recommended:

Of all the personal development books I’ve read: How Will You Measure Your Life by Clayton Christensen is my favorite https://amzn.to/2IUwjQ3

This book changed my business and made it more profitable in one easy read. Profit First by Mike Michalowicz  https://amzn.to/2GUCb9H

Here are the books recommended by the other folks in the room.

1.    The Leaders Voice by Clark and Crossland https://amzn.to/2DoU3ay

2.    Made to Stick by Chip and Dan Heath https://amzn.to/2IuNwyZ

3.    Tribe of Mentors by Timothy Ferriss https://amzn.to/2IuOrQi

4.    Yes You Can by Natalie Turner https://amzn.to/2HnduD2

5.    It’s Your Ship by Michael Abrashoff https://amzn.to/2GuOZU0

6.    Leaders Eat Last by Simon Sinek https://amzn.to/2DlAK1M

7.    Power of Storytelling by Ty Bennett https://amzn.to/2GuqPZJ

8.    Atomic Habits by James Clear https://amzn.to/2XnUdGw

9.    Rejection Proof by Jia Jang https://amzn.to/2IrTD7t

10. Building A Story Brand by Donald Miller https://amzn.to/2Is0GwH

11. Where There’s Hope by Elizabeth Smart https://amzn.to/2UJwR1b

12. The Coaching Habit Say less, ask more and change the way you lead forever by Michael Bungay Stainer https://amzn.to/2Gs9gbE

13. Crushing It by Gary Vaynerchuck https://amzn.to/2DhrRpJ

14. Good To Great by Jim Collins https://amzn.to/2GuQce0

15. Dog Poop Initiative by Kirk Weisler https://amzn.to/2DmMtNx

16. Dare to Lead by Brene Brown https://amzn.to/2UMZXwH

17. Radical Candor by Kim Scott https://amzn.to/2VbahxY

18. Four disciplines of Execution by Stephen Covey and Chris McChesney https://amzn.to/2VaTye8

19. Energy Leadership by Bruce Schneider https://amzn.to/2Pmsofa

20. Killer Angels by Michael Shaara https://amzn.to/2IurBYI

21. The Once & Future King by T. H. White https://amzn.to/2Pf8zpQ

22. Flow by Millay Csikszentmihalyi https://amzn.to/2IuAUYD

23. Execution by Ram Charan https://amzn.to/2GlcKwk

24. The Forgotten Man – Amity Shales https://amzn.to/2PhdZRn

25. The 12 Rules for Life and Anecdote for Chaos – Jordan Peterson https://amzn.to/2DlR3LM

AND…If you haven’t read it, can I shamelessly plug my book: The Make It Happen Blueprint?  Yep, it’s my blog, I can! 😉 https://amzn.to/2PEauVh

Time Management Advice From A High Performance Speaker & Author

VIDEO - Time Management Begins With A Time Mindset

You’ve probably heard the phrase “either you run the day or the day runs you.” And I wholeheartedly agree!

In this video I share a foundational principle to time management, something I learned the hard way!

What do I do if my kid is getting bullied online?

Question and Answer series with Michelle McCullough

October is National Bullying Awareness Month and with a cell phone in the hands of almost every teen, the subject of cyber bullying deserves attention and discussion.

Today I’m going to share three tips to help your kids if they are being bullied and two tips to help your kid if THEY are the bully.

This post features some frequently asked questions on cyber bullying.

Question #1:
It seems like cyber bulling cases are becoming more and more frequent. What would you say is the first step if they’re being bullied online?

Michelle: Take it offline. Don’t continue to engage in the conversation virtually. Stop the digital dialogue because you won’t be able to change their minds. Decide if you need to address it with the person or parents over the phone or in person and involve any other parties that may need to be notified. Use the three D’s to work through serious situations: Document, discuss and delete.

Question #2:
Once things are said, even if it’s deleted, it can stay with someone for a long time. Maybe even forever. How do you start to process and resolve the situation?

Michelle: It can be tempting to back go the scene and see what else has been said and get back into the conversation, that’s why it’s important to make a change. Perhaps limit social media use, if it happened on Instagram, give it break for awhile, let the “news cycle” change if you will. Fill the time with something else completely. Go to a movie, read a book but change things up.

Question #3:
What do you recommend if it continues to happen or if your child isn’t “bouncing back”?

Michelle: Don’t be afraid to get additional support. Your child may need counseling or support at school with teachers and administration. Don’t wait. The longer things go unresolved the worse they can be long term. That’s why the acting is SO important. Resolve the issue with the kid or parents, but make sure your child gets professional help if needed.

Question #4:
Now let’s turn the tables, what if you find out your kid is the bully?

Michelle: This is where we use the three Cs. Collect, Clean and Checkup.
Before you dive into the convo with your kid, make sure your facts are straight. Collect information to make sure you have a good picture of what happened.
Talk to your kid and clean it up. If they need to delete something, make sure it gets done, if they need to make amends, make sure they do it verbally or in person – not just online. Help them understand that seeing someone and having to say it to their face makes the difference.
Finally, checkup. After the events check in with your kid, with the platform used and continue to keep the conversation going.

Only a few things I’ve learned in 2017

What Have You Learned?

I have learned to allow my body more time to rest and heal than I think I need. I have learned to rely on my support team in bigger ways. I have learned that it’s never wrong to put my family first. I have learned that when my priorities are right I make more money than the hustle. I have learned that it’s not about the money. I have learned that the new things we think will solve our problems won’t. It’s not about finding something new, it’s about realizing the classics and the true. I have learned that my self-confidence cannot be based on what others think about me, want me to be or about what size I am. I’ve learned to be a little more and do a little less. I’ve learned about patience. I’ve learned that people grow and change and there’s still a core to love with them. I’ve learned that my kids are my bucket list. I’ve learned how to consume the news in a way that helps me live in knowledge but not fear. I’ve learned to spend more time with the Lord in his word and with the words of the prophets (and that I still have more to learn). I’ve learned that I’m still doing some things because I think I should instead because it’s something I want to do. I’ve learned that I was too busy and next year will be different. I’ve also learned that my life is awesome, my kids are awesome and love truly is the answer to everything.
What have you learned?

Why Travelling with My Kids is SO Important

  • be980738-92ad-4db3-b081-6d3ee06769adI come from a long line of world travelers.  Some ancestors pass on dimples or bushy eyebrows (I got those, too…sigh), my grandparents passed on the travel bug.  My dad’s father was a travel agent and toured the world many times over.  In his home he has a map with all the places he’s been marked by colored pins – different colors share the number of times he’s been to a specific location.  My mom’s father was a tour guide for Brigham Young University’s Travel Study program.  He, too, was a globetrotter visiting every continent multiple times.

My mom carried on this tradition and took us kids on a family trip once or twice a year.  Even as a single mom she carted four kids all over.  We went to New York City, San Francisco, Anaheim (Disneyland & Universal Studios), Mexico, Idaho, and what felt like hundreds of national parks.  She didn’t let her single status stop her from taking us on amazing adventures. I’ll be forever grateful.

I know that’s one reason I LOVE my job.  Opportunities to speak and consult all over the country help me scratch the itch of travel.  I dream of the days when I take my kids on solo trips, paid for by event planners.

This year included many travel memories I won’t forget. In October I went with my mom to see the Northern Lights in Alaska, a bucket list trip in celebration of her 60th birthday.   In September I got to go with my husband to Germany where he checked off his bucket list item: driving a German car on the Autobahn at unlimited speed.  (We topped out at 240 kms, which is about 150 miles per hour).  In both cases I went along for other people’s bucket list’s and my mom asked, “What’s on your bucket list?”

Quite frankly, I feel like travel of any kind checks things off my bucket list and I don’t have to go far.

This summer I took my kids to Universal Orlando Resort.  My brother Merlin joined us from Philadelphia and my sister Melinda flew with us from Salt Lake we had a great time!  My kids enjoyed interactive wands and we explored the new Volcano Bay.  It was a week I’ll never forget.

I live by the philosophy, experiences beat stuff, hands down.  We can fill our kids room with things (that never get played with) or we can take them on trips, take a bajillion pictures (I’m still an avid scrapbooker) and talk about the fun we had for weeks and months to come.  Seeing a new place, or even visiting an old favorite lasts longer – even if the price tag is higher.  Yes, yes, my kids still have stuff, but we save our pennies for trips.

I also believe that it’s important in our family to let my kids earn money and pay for trips – they’ll appreciate them more.  One of the reasons I love being an entrepreneur is because I get to create my own money.  I want to teach my kids that money doesn’t show up, you get to work for it. Both of my kids are under the age of 10, but they have been earning their trips since they were little.  Now they earn money, but then they earned stickers.  We don’t do this for family reunions and ALL trips, but we love to have them earn at least souvenir money, but often it’s a lot more.

Whether we can afford to pick up the tab or not, something magical happens when my kids get to earn their own money.  They learn the value of money and that trips aren’t cheap, and they get to have a sense of pride when they’re there – they appreciate it more than if mom and dad pay for everything.  It was super nice this year to tell them that they needed to earn all of their Universal spending money.  My son spent every dime in the Transformers store (his favorite ride from the trip) and my daughter spent $5 here and $5 there buying churros and pretzels and her last $12 was spent on a Minions fanny pack, but there were no fights or begging for me to buy stuff.  They had the money or they didn’t and it was great all around.

They sold cookies and ties, did extra jobs for me and others and worked really hard.  I want my kids to know that if they want something, they can work hard and earn it. While we were walking through the Diagon Alley and riding Gringots for tenth time I was so grateful that I hadn’t just caved and paid for it.  I probably spent 50 hours in the kitchen helping the kids make cookies, and if I had spent that time in my business, I would have made 50 times the money.  But it felt good to teach the kids the value of a dollar and it turns out we all liked the trip a bit more because we put some time into it.

In the end I’m collecting memories.  Sure, I’d love to go to Italy or see the Great Wall of China, but right now, travelling with my kids and helping them make solid memories is my bucket list.  I love the theme from the park, “Dreams are Universal.”  Being with my family this summer felt like heaven and I’ll have those memories forever.